North St Catharines Walking Tour: Lake St. to Geneva St.

Duration: 20 minutes Difficulty: Easy

Between Lake and Geneva St. the channel is cleaned up. Two roads line the route from Lake to Scott St. After Scott St. a 1 km greenway marks the rest of the route. The remains of an old railway bridge still sits next to Scott St. Lock 6 once located right on the edge of Geneva Street is gone. Click on the map to jump to a description and picture for each item.

1.
The Swing Bridge 1921: There really is only one remnant between Lake and Geneva St. . A railway line that once ran from Port Dalhousie St. Catharines crossed the 3rd Welland Canal in this section. The picture on the right was taken from an ariel photograph taken in 1921. It's been rotated to line up closely with the map shown above.
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swingbridge.jpg
2.
View from the Street: From most angles including this one the bridge abutments are difficult to figure out. They vary in height, size, and shape.
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bridge2.jpg
3.
In the Channel: The remnants make more sense when your standing in the channel of the canal. In this picture you can see the narrow opening that ships had to go through.
The structure that the bridge swung on is the structure on the right side of the picture. The southern wall of the canal would be represented by the structure on the left side of the picture.

The object between the two structures is made of concrete and was probably added after the canal was closed in 1932.

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4.
Unidentified structure: I'm not entirely sure what this is. It's about 50 feet from the bridge and in line with the rail line. It may mark the point where the road on the south side of the canal crossed the railway.
Regardless, it does look rather festive.
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bridge.jpg

5.
Lock 6 - 1921: There's no sign of it now but Lock 6 was located right on the edge of Geneva St. You can see the street as the clear white line zig-zagging from the top to the bottom of the picture. The lock was probably placed here so that Geneva St. could cross where the canal was narrow and where lock tenders could easily operate the bridge.
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lock6.jpg

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